Climate Change: Himalayan water resources under tremendous pressure

A new study by British Antarctic Service (BAS) scientists has identified 100 current research questions on climate change and Himalayan water resources in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB) that need to be answered to protect the communities that live there.

The Upper Indus Basin (UIB) is a mountainous region in the Himalayas from which rivers originate. Which provides most of the world for irrigation and drinking water in agriculture. Millions of people in India, Pakistan, China and Afghanistan are dependent on these water resources, so they need to adapt to climate change.

A new study has identified 100 research questions on climate change and the impact on water resources in the Upper Indus Basin (UIB). The answers to these questions are vital to protecting the people who live there. This study was based on 100 scientific papers by scientists from the British Antarctic Service (BAS).

A new study published in Earth’s Future uses horizon scanning techniques to identify 100 important questions needed to successfully adapt to current and future climate change at UIB. The aim of the study is to identify gaps in knowledge and opportunities in the social and natural sciences to help inform climate plans, water management and development policy.

BAS scientists have amazing experience in glaciology and onboard radar techniques used for research in Antarctica and mountainous regions around the world, which are also the center of current BAS research in the Himalayas.

The new study now uses UIB’s “horizontal scanning” technology to identify 100 important issues needed to successfully adapt to current and future climate change. The research aims to identify information and opportunities in the social and natural sciences to help advance climate planning, water management and development.

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These issues push the boundaries of modern thinking and cover a wide range of topics related to governance and policy, socio-economic processes and the processes of the Earth’s system.

BAS climate researcher Dr Andrew Orr, who led the study, said:

“UIB’s water resources are under ever-increasing pressure, including population growth, industrialization and, of course, the serious threat posed by climate change. If we are to successfully adapt to current and future hydrological and climate change in the region, we must close the gaps in the social and natural sciences. It is likely that in the coming years there will be radical changes in this area, and the issues we have identified must be considered if we want to be ready. “

The study demonstrates the exciting potential of the international community to develop water management, climate plans and policies that will ensure and protect UIB for future generations.

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