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Traditional Medicinal Plants from Gurez Valley

Traditional Medicinal Plants from Gurez Valley

The Gurez valley is situated along the Krishna Ganga river and is less exploited. It has reserve forests. The forests are very rich in herbal wealth. The area’s population consists of Dard types, Kashimiries; Gujars and Pathans. They have faith in herbs and the elders of the family mostly know the uses of herbs and prescribe them for ailments to their relatives and neighbours.

The folklores of 56 species of plants belonging to 50 genera and 28 families and neighbours. The folklores of 56 plant species belonging to 50 genera and 28 families and their mode of administration were collected during the reconnaissance of the area. Botanical names have been listed with citations by author, plant family, local name, connection to altitude, and medicinal uses.

gurez valley pictures
Medicinal Plants Gurez Valley

The folklores of 56 species of plants belonging to 50 genera and 28 families and neighbours. The folklores of 56 plant species belonging to 50 genera and 28 families and their mode of administration were collected during the reconnaissance of the area. Botanical names have been listed with citations by author, plant family, local name, connection to altitude, and medicinal uses.

Like other Himalayan mountain grasslands, Minimarg (Gurez) is rich in medicinal plants. Knowledge about the habitat distribution uses, and mode of use of these plants is well maintained within the three ethnic tribes that use this area during the summer months.

The community elders and women have a good knowledge of the habitat, life history characteristics, regeneration, and uses of the medicinal plants they collect. The continuing belief of these communities in these high-altitude plants (traditional medicine) and the absence of modern alternative medicine facilities for them have greatly affected their source of medicine in this high-altitude area. The data collected through the questionnaires highlighted indigenous uses and reflected the collection, trade and dependence of these ethnic peoples on high-altitude medicinal plants.

People harvest various medicinal plants endemic to the region for various uses and trade them for commercial profit from the forests. On average, a household harvests about 5 kg of medicinal plants of various kinds in a year; however, the amount of extraction varies by area.

Medicinal Plants Gurez Valley

The present study was carried out as a special task under the Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Science and Technology Kashmir Tribal Sub-Plan (SKUAST-K) through a team of multidisciplinary scientists to carry out media analysis. of life in the economically, socially and geographically disadvantaged region of the Gurez Valley and explore issues of vulnerability, externality and sustainability in order to formulate a future roadmap for targeted interventions through research and development in agriculture and related sectors.

Medicinal Plants Gurez Valley

Some Locals of Gurez told GroundReport.in about the Traditional Medicinal Plants of Gurez Valley and regional names as well.

Mushk bullet (Scientific name: Valeriana Wallichi)

Known as Indian valerian and called mushk bala in Urdu, this is a perennial herb that has medicinal uses. Its rhizomes and roots are dried and used as a tonic. It can be used against epilepsy, neurosis as well as for the treatment of constipation and cough. Its consumption can help reduce anxiety, and it is believed to be a detoxifier.

Chora (Scientific name: Angelica glauca)

Known by the names of Chora, Choru or Gandrayan, this herb is used to treat digestive problems and helps heal wounds. Its powdered root, when given with warm water to children, can relieve vomiting and stomach upset.

Medicinal Plants Gurez Valley

Belladonna (Scientific name: Atropa belladonna)

This tall, bushy shrub is used in alternative medicine as a cure for arthritis pain and nerve problems. It can help treat hay fever, colds, irritable bowel syndrome, and motion sickness.

kalajeera (Scientific name: Bunium persicum)

Known as kalonji, or kala jeera, in India, it is a commonly used spice in cooking. It helps treat digestive problems and flatulence, and is good for menstrual health. It helps reduce blood sugar levels and bad cholesterol, and improves cardiovascular health. According to Ayurveda, it is said to help maintain a balance between Vata, Pitta and Kapha Doshas in the body.

Kasini (Scientific name: Cichorium intybus)

Commonly known as chicory, it is a perennial herbaceous plant that belongs to the daisy family. It is widely used as a substitute for coffee. Helps against loss of appetite and stomach problems such as constipation. It is used as medicine for liver and gallbladder disorders. It is said to help increase bile production. With its refreshing action, it helps against fever. It increases urine output and helps remove toxins from the kidneys. Its roots reduce inflammation and the juice of its leaves helps purify the blood.

Sheetkar (Scientific name: Fritillaria roylei)

This perennial herb finds application in alternative medicine. It is used against coughs and has traditionally been used to treat rheumatism. Its bulbs are boiled with orange peels and prescribed for tuberculosis and asthma.

Medicinal Plants Gurez Valley

Rattanjot (Scientific name: Alkanna tinctoria)

It is a spice that is used to give flavor and also as a natural colorant. It is also called Alkanet Root and is commonly used in Indian cooking. It is used to treat fever and wounds. Ratanjot oil promotes hair growth and helps prevent premature graying of hair. It is commonly used in face masks and other skin care products. It is said to be useful against skin infections and burn scars. It helps reduce inflammation and has a cooling effect on the body.

White berry mistletoe (Scientific name: Viscum album L)

It is a semiparasitic plant that grows on large trees. Since a long time, it has been used in medicine. It is said to help maintain cardiovascular health and reduce stress and anxiety. It stimulates the immune system and helps fight health conditions such as epilepsy, rheumatism, and arthritis. It is useful against cold, headaches and respiratory problems. In addition, it is also known to help lower blood pressure.

Indian blonde (Scientific name: Rubia cordifolia)

It is a vine found in the Himalayas and is commonly known as Manjistha. In Ayurveda, it is used as a detoxifying herb, which helps remove impurities from the blood. Its topical application helps relieve skin problems such as rashes, itching, and dryness. Helps against arthritis, improves digestion and boosts immune health.

Kashmir mallow (Scientific name: Lavatera kashmiriana)

This ornamental and medicinal plant found in the Himalayan region of Kashmir is used as a diuretic and as a medicine for digestive problems. Its root is used in the preparation of medicine to treat rheumatic pain.

Nut (Scientific name: Juglans regia)

Widely found in the Gurez Valley, walnut trees have medicinal uses. Commonly consumed as a nut, its health benefits include lowering blood pressure and blood sugar levels, promoting digestive health, and improving brain function. Walnuts are rich in antioxidants and healthy fats and one of the best plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids.

Willow (Scientific name: Salix)

Willow bark is a natural aspirin. It helps reduce pain in the muscles and joints and thus helps against arthritis. Helps reduce fever and treat symptoms of the common cold.

These were some of the traditional medicinal plants of the Gurez Valley of Kashmir. Human activities and habitat destruction have caused some of these plant species to be classified as threatened. We should make serious efforts to preserve the biodiversity in Jammu and Kashmir so that such plants of medicinal value are saved from extinction.

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