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Seized langurs kept illegally in Agra are finally rescued and released

The Uttar Pradesh Forest Department recently conducted a successful rescue operation in Agra, saving nine Indian grey langurs from Company Gardens in Sadar. These langurs, consisting of six females, two males, and a baby

By Ground Report
New Update
The grey langur is protected under Schedule II of the Wildlife (Protection) Act

The grey langur is protected under Schedule II of the Wildlife (Protection) Act.

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To combat illegal wildlife exploitation, the Uttar Pradesh Forest Department orchestrated a successful rescue mission to save nine Indian grey langurs from Company Gardens, Sadar in Agra. Reports had surfaced indicating that the langurs, comprising six females, two males, and a baby, were found tied up with ropes, prompting swift action from the forest authorities. After carefully removing the restraints, the langurs were granted permission from relevant authorities and released back into their natural habitat.

Langurs Seized, Rescued, Released in Agra

The operation unfolded following a complaint received by the Uttar Pradesh Forest Department regarding Indian grey langurs being unlawfully restrained in a residential area of Agra's Sadar locality. Promptly responding to the tip-off, the forest department sprang into action, resulting in the successful rescue of the nine langurs, which included six females, two males, and a baby langur.

Following their rescue, the langurs were securely transported in a designated carrier and subsequently released into the wild with due permissions from the court, facilitated by the assistance of Wildlife SOS.

After obtaining permission from the relevant authorities, the langurs were released back in the wild.
After obtaining permission from the relevant authorities, the langurs were released back in the wild.

Adarsh Kumar, the Divisional Forest Officer in Agra, emphasized the gravity of the situation, stating, "It is an illegal trade, and we are diligently working to track down offenders and curb this practice. The grey langur, protected under Schedule II of the Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972, is not the only species affected; harboring other wild animals such as parakeets and indigenous turtles is also illegal and subject to legal repercussions."

Baiju Raj M.V., Director of Conservation Projects at Wildlife SOS, shed light on their longstanding collaboration with the forest department, spanning over two decades, to address human-wildlife conflicts and combat poaching. "With our wildlife hospital and equipped veterinary team, we promptly attend to these animals, ensuring their well-being and facilitating their release back into their natural habitat," he explained.

Nine Indian grey langurs were successfully rescued by UP Forest Department from Sadar area in Agra.
Nine Indian grey langurs were successfully rescued by UP Forest Department from Sadar area in Agra

Indian grey langurs

The illegal exploitation of grey langurs, often exploited due to their longstanding rivalry with rhesus macaques, perpetuates the false notion that they can effectively mitigate the 'monkey menace' prevalent in several Indian cities. However, this myth only serves to fuel the illicit trade further.

Indian grey langurs, characterized by their large, grey stature and distinctive black face and ears, are primarily found in India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Thriving in diverse habitats such as deserts, tropical rainforests, and montane regions, these adaptable creatures can also acclimate to human settlements, often found in villages, towns, and areas with housing or agricultural activities.

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